Historical View From The 10th Tee

View from the 10th Tee in 1929

 

View from the 10th Tee – Prior to using the goats in September 2010

 

Current View from the 10th Tee - December 2011

 

The goats did an amazing job during their first visit to the 10th canyon.  This particular area was the largest and steepest of any canyons that the goats hit and also grew back with the most material during the spring of 2011.  Having the goats come back for a second round in 2011 made an even greater difference in the way the 10th canyon appears.  Nearly all non-native material was consumed and the current view from the 10th tee changes the depth perception and makes the carry over the canyon seem even further on this difficult par-4.

Trees a Crowd

120-year-old Coastal Live Oak tree that split and quietly fell during the March 19th storm
How the wide open, right side approach shot appeared after the oak tree was lost

The first two of three oak trees added to the right side of the 14th fairway

During the March 19th storm, we lost seven trees total when the intense wind and rain storm ripped through the golf course.  Losing the massive 120-year-old coastal live oak along the 14th fairway was a tough.  Not only was that tree there before the golf course was ever built, but it is had impacted shots for many generations.  With that tree gone, the right side of the fairway had no protection.  MacKenzie intended shots to play from the left side and the angled green complex clearly identifies his intention.  Looking over several pictures from the 1930’s, there were (3) trees that stood on the right side of the 14th fairway.  When the final soldier fell, it was time to bring back the design intent.  Three coastal live oak trees were transplanted in the same location as in the 1931 aerial photograph indicated.  



Third tree added to frame the right side and bring back the original design of the 14th hole


Ghost of MacKenzie

A view from the 2nd fairway showing how the 3rd green complex looked in 1929

Photo taken two years ago with the massive Monterey Cypress adjacent to the right side of the 3rd green
Following the March 19th storm the cypress was severely damaged and was completely removed

Turf managers know the problems trees can possess on the ability to grow healthy grass.  Architects know the fine balance between trees and turfgrass.  Dr. MacKenzie never intended a tree to be planted adjacent to the third green and felt that the severe green complex would be a fair enough test for the 235-yard uphill par 3.  The massive monterey cypress tree that grew on the right side of the green complex impacted shots for nearly 50-years and MacKenzie intended the right side to be a bail out area.  If you hit a shot that landed under that tree or had to hit through it, up to the third green, you almost guaranteed bogey.  The ghost of MacKenzie roared through on the night of March 19th when a massive wind storm took out the majority of the tree.  It was so severely damaged that the decision was made to remove the remaining stump and limbs.  Upon driving through the club entrance, one is now made aware of the famous MacKenzie bunkering as it is no longer hidden by the cypress tree.  From an architectural standpoint and a turfgrass manager standpoint, we all agree that this was a good thing.  The third hole is now more reminiscent of how the green complex looked in 1929.